Events

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Friday, May 9th: Gentrifying the Congo: A Conversation with Artist Renzo Martin

Friday, May 9th: Gentrifying the Congo: A Conversation with Artist Renzo Martin

May 09, 2014
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room

Renzo Martens is a controversial Dutch artist and filmmaker who in 2010 founded the Institute for Human Activities, an arts-based development program in Democratic Republic of Congo that brings together artists, thinkers and specialists. With a nod to precedents in cities like New York and Berlin, the Institute aims to turn art production into an engine of economic growth in Congo, hoping to improve the lives of the people around its settlement. Renzo will present the Institute of Human Activities and discuss its relationship to his previous work in the Congo, the documentary film “Episode III: Enjoy Poverty”.

In conversation with Claire Bishop (Art History, Graduate Center, CUNY) and Ashley Dawson (English, College of Staten and Graduate Center, CUNY).

Friday, April 25th: Globalizing Critical Theory: Symposium

Friday, April 25th: Globalizing Critical Theory: Symposium

April 25, 2014
1:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Graduate Center, Room C203/204

A symposium exploring the questions, conditions, and politics of global critical theory in the contemporary with papers by Souleymane Bachir Diagne, Manu Goswami, and Yoav DiCapua, and with comments by Uday Mehta.

Friday, April 4th: Critical Horizons: Beyond Marxism vs. Postcolonialism: A Symposium

Friday, April 4th: Critical Horizons: Beyond Marxism vs. Postcolonialism: A Symposium

April 04, 2014
9:30 am - 6:30 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, 5307

A symposium exploring the critical horizons of Marxism and Postcolonialism in contemporary social thought with papers by Vinay Gidwani, Anne-Maria Makhulu, Jini Kim Watson and comments by Ruth Wilson Gilmore.

Thursday, March 27th: Finding Something Different: Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics: Book launch and Discussion with Anthony Alessandrini

Thursday, March 27th: Finding Something Different: Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics: Book launch and Discussion with Anthony Alessandrini

March 27, 2014
4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Graduate Center, Room 5109

A Book Launch and Discussion with Anthony Alessandrini, on the publication of Finding Something Different: Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics (2013), with discussants J. Michael Dash, Professor of French, Social and Cultural Analysis, and Comparative Lit at NYU and Kandice Chuh, English Graduate Center.

Friday, March 14th: “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

Friday, March 14th: “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

March 14, 2014 - March 27, 2014
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Room C198

A discussion of the Gezi Park protests, which erupted in Istanbul in late May 2013 with Anthony Alessandrini, Jay Cassano, Louis Fishman, Aslı Iğsız, Elif Sarı, Cihan Tekay, and Emrah Yildiz. The event coincides with the publication of “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey, (Jadaliyya/Tadween Publishing), a collection of essays intended as a pedagogical resource for those teaching and studying recent events in Turkey.

Friday, February 7th: Imperial Debris: Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler

Friday, February 7th: Imperial Debris: Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler

February 07, 2014
1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room

A Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler on the publication of Imperial Debris: On Ruins and Ruination (Duke University Press, 2013). Stoler will be in conversation with Uday Mehta, Chelsea Shields, Neferti Tadiar, Megan Vaughan, Gary Wilder.

Friday, February 7th: Imperial Debris: Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler

February 07, 2014
1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room

Friday, February 7th: Imperial Debris: Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler

A Roundtable with Ann Laura Stoler (New School for Social Research) on the publication of Imperial Debris: On Ruins and Ruination (Duke University Press, 2013)

In conversation with Uday Mehta (The Graduate Center, CUNY) , Chelsea Shields (The Graduate Center, CUNY), Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College), Megan Vaughan (The Graduate Center, CUNY), Gary Wilder (The Graduate Center, CUNY).

Friday, February 7th 1:30pm to 4pm Skylight Room Graduate Center, CUNY 365 Fifth Ave, New York, NY 10016

Imperial Debris redirects critical focus from ruins as evidence of the past to “ruination” as the processes through which imperial power occupies the present. Ann Laura Stoler’s introduction, ”The rot remains”: from ruins to ruination,” is a manifesto, a compelling call for postcolonial studies to expand its analytical scope to address the toxic but less perceptible corrosions and violent accruals of colonial aftermaths, as well as their durable traces on the material environment and people’s bodies and minds. Screen Shot 2013-11-08 at 1.56.01 PM Contributors Nancy Hunt, E. Valentine Daniel, Greg Grandin, Sharad Chari, John Collins, Ariella Azoulay,  Gastón Gordillo, Joseph Masco, and Vyjayanthi Rao offer provocative, tightly focused responses to Stoler, exploring subjects as seemingly diverse as villages submerged during the building of a massive dam in southern India, Palestinian children taught to envision and document ancestral homes razed by the Israeli military, and survival on the toxic edges of oil refineries and amid the remains of apartheid in Durban, South Africa. They consider the significance of Cold War imagery of a United States decimated by nuclear blast, perceptions of a swath of Argentina’s Gran Chaco as a barbarous void, and the enduring resonance, in contemporary sexual violence, of atrocities in King Leopold’s Congo. Reflecting on the physical destruction of Sri Lanka, on Detroit as a colonial metropole in relation to sites of ruination in the Amazon, and on interactions near a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the Brazilian state of Bahia, the contributors attend to present-day harms in the occluded, unexpected sites and situations where earlier imperial formations persist. Ann Laura Stoler is the Willy Brandt Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies at the New School for Social Research. She is the author of Along the Archival Grain: Epistemic Anxieties and Colonial Common Sense and Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: Race and the Intimate in Colonial Rule. Her books Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault’s History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things and Haunted by Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History are both also published by Duke University Press. pic_ann-stoler

Wednesday, February 5th: Academics Writing Fiction: Ruth Behar and Paul Stoller in Conversation

Wednesday, February 5th: Academics Writing Fiction: Ruth Behar and Paul Stoller in Conversation

February 05, 2014
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room

Anthropologists Ruth Behar and Paul Stoller consider the possibilities and place of fiction within the social sciences, and reflect on the kinds of creative and experimental writing that they and other academics have engaged in. The panel will be moderated by Sujatha Fernandes, Associate Professor of Sociology at CUNY.

Friday, Nov 22nd 1pm: Heare Now Aimé Césaire! with Gary Wilder

Friday, Nov 22nd 1pm: Heare Now Aimé Césaire! with Gary Wilder

November 22, 2013
12:00 am - 2:45 pm
Room C203

Join Gary Wilder as he explores Aimé Césaire’s distinctive critical orientation to politics, culture, and knowledge during the period of decolonization as he pursued projects that were at once situated and world-historical, realist and utopian, pragmatic and aesthetic, timely and untimely. The aim is to recognize Césaire as an innovative thinker of his time who can also speak directly to many of the political and theoretical predicaments of our times.

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