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Seeing Global: History in a Communist Mode

April 28, 2011
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

In the early 1920s, Lukács lamented the fact that modern society had lost every image of the whole. Influenced by Hegel, he believed that the “totality” could only be seen from a historical perspective, grasped as a sequence of stages that led from feudalism to capitalism and beyond. “Seeing Global” proposes an alternative, one that requires a reappropriation of the cultural heritage…

MUSLIM ZION by Faisal Devji

September 27, 2011
12:00 am
CUNY Graduate Center, Martin E. Segal Theatre

Faisal Devji is University Reader in Modern South Asian History at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. He has held faculty positions at the New School in New York, Yale University and the University of Chicago, from where he also received his PhD in Intellectual History…

Etienne Balibar: Europe, America, and the Crisis

Etienne Balibar: Europe, America, and the Crisis

October 05, 2011
12:00 am - 2:00 pm

Etienne Balibar is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris-X. As one of Louis Althusser’s most brilliant students in the 1960s, Etienne Balibar contributed to the collective theoretical masterpiece of Reading Capital. Since then he has established himself amongst the most subtle philosophical and political thinkers in France. He has worked extensively on general problematics such as the theme of universalism and difference…

Leti Volpp: Indigenous as Alien

Leti Volpp: Indigenous as Alien

October 14, 2011
12:00 am

Immigration law’s focus is nation-state sovereignty and the ability of the state to exclude or deport aliens, who are understood to move spatially to the nation state, seeking entry or admittance. But this vision of immigration law fails to recognize settler colonialism, and, in particular, its grounding on preexisting indigenous populations’ territory…

Imagine Real Democracy

Imagine Real Democracy

October 18, 2011
12:00 am

The first in a series of conversations that will take place between global social movement actors framed around both the nature of the global crisis and the various ways the new mass movements are responding. Our first conversation focuses on the origins of the movements in Egypt, Spain and the US, and the novel democratic forms that each movement is inventing, from direct democracy and mass assemblies to spokes councils. The second part of the events discussion will be organized around questions that the various movement participants will ask of one another. We hope to facilitate a discussion that both answers questions and raises even more questions.

Todos Somos Japon: The World After Fukushima 3/11

Todos Somos Japon: The World After Fukushima 3/11

October 21, 2011
12:00 am

Although information has been coming in from Japan since 3/11, there is a huge gap between what the Japanese are actually experiencing, doing and thinking after the Fukushima nuclear accident, and what the people in the US know and think about it. We are inviting three intellectuals/activists from Japan to share their first hand experiences and thoughts with us here in the US, and to discuss together the significance of the situation, the question of our human survival and the global struggles for it.

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