Fellowships

The Committee on Globalization and Social Change fellowship search for the 2014–2015 seminar is open.

Call for Fellowship Applications
“Humanity”

The annual theme for the Committee on Globalization and Social Change at the CUNY Graduate Center for the academic year 2014-2015 will be “humanity.” As in our previous years focused on “solidarity” and “temporality,” we will organize our seminar and public programming around this key concept that has variously enabled, shaped, and foreclosed a variety of social, political, ethical, cultural, and aesthetic traditions, processes, practices, and formations on various scales (with emancipatory and heteronomous valences).

The CGSC is a transdisciplinary group whose collective work is not driven by any specific theory or ideology. We begin with the observation that existing categories and analytic frameworks are inadequate to grasp the dynamics of our historical present. We are thus interested not only in questioning conventional assumptions in light of contemporary developments but also in the possibility of reclaiming, reworking, and refunctioning seemingly outmoded concepts in and for these times. Given our interest in reflecting on the relationship between inherited concepts, critical theory, the contemporary situation, and political futures, we believe it will be fruitful to think together about the question of “humanity” today, beyond the familiar debates between abstract universal humanism and concrete cultural particularism.

Scholars have long examined how a certain conception of both the human and humanity as a whole authorized modern scientific rationality, natural law, Enlightenment universality, liberal democracy and secularism as well as corresponding forms of imperial expansion, Atlantic slavery, and colonial racism. Many of these assumptions continue to inform contemporary practices of humanitarianism, human rights advocacy, and international law. Throughout the modern period critical conceptions of humanity have also subtended emancipatory currents of socialism, mutualism, anarchism, feminism, internationalism, and cosmopolitanism. This legacy may be recognized in differently coordinated international solidarity movements for insurgencies across the Global South, Occupy movements against capitalist globalization and neoliberal privatization and in defense of community commons, for a global public sphere or in the name of global democracy and justice. Far reaching questions about the human and humanity continue to fuel other arenas of debate across the disciplines concerning, for example: alternative modernities, non-Eurocentric epistemologies, world literature and translation, global universities, contemporary art, biopower and biopolitics, big science, genomics, and the so-called neuroscience revolution, trauma theory, environmental crisis and the anthropocene, and conventional divisions between humans and non-human animals.

We thus welcome applications from faculty and doctoral candidates for whom the question of humanity figures in some significant way in their research. We are interested in scholars from any field whose thinking crosses traditional academic boundaries and whose work is empirically rich and theoretically informed.

Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar, held Tuesday mornings. Please note: Ability to attend seminars on Tuesday mornings is a prerequisite of eligibility. During the fall semester, the seminar is usually focused on readings and presentations by visitors. In the spring fellows will present their work in progress for group discussion. Fellows are also expected to do their best to attend corresponding public events on the theme of humanity that will take place throughout the year.

With generous support from the Mellon Foundation and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor, The Committee on Globalization and Social Change currently offers the following fellowships to individuals who would like to participate in a research seminar on the selected theme for the upcoming year:

2014–2015 Seminar: Humanity

2014–2015 Seminar: Humanity

The annual theme for the Committee on Globalization and Social Change (CGSC) at the Graduate Center CUNY for the academic year 2014-2015 will be “humanity.” As in our previous years focused on “solidarity” and “temporality,” we will organize our seminar and public programming around this key concept that has variously enabled, shaped, and foreclosed a variety of social, political, ethical, cultural, and aesthetic traditions, processes, practices, and formations on various scales (with emancipatory and heteronomous valences).

The CGSC is a transdisciplinary group whose collective work is not driven by any specific theory or ideology. We begin with the observation that existing categories and analytic frameworks are inadequate to grasp the dynamics of our historical present. We are thus interested not only in questioning conventional assumptions in light of contemporary developments but also in the possibility of reclaiming, reworking, and refunctioning seemingly outmoded concepts in and for these times. Given our interest in reflecting on the relationship between inherited concepts, critical theory, the contemporary situation, and political futures, we believe it will be fruitful to think together about the question of “humanity” today, beyond the familiar debates between abstract universal humanism and concrete cultural particularism.

Scholars have long examined how a certain conception of both the human and humanity as a whole authorized modern scientific rationality, natural law, Enlightenment universality, liberal democracy and secularism as well as corresponding forms of imperial expansion, Atlantic slavery, and colonial racism. Many of these assumptions continue to inform contemporary practices of humanitarianism, human rights advocacy, and international law. Throughout the modern period critical conceptions of humanity have also subtended emancipatory currents of socialism, mutualism, anarchism, feminism, internationalism, and cosmopolitanism. This legacy may be recognized in differently coordinated international solidarity movements for insurgencies across the Global South, Occupy movements against capitalist globalization and neoliberal privatization and in defense of community commons, for a global public sphere or in the name of global democracy and justice. Far reaching questions about the human and humanity continue to fuel other arenas of debate across the disciplines concerning, for example: alternative modernities, non-Eurocentric epistemologies, world literature and translation, global universities, contemporary art, biopower and biopolitics, big science, genomics, and the so-called neuroscience revolution, trauma theory, environmental crisis and the anthropocene, and conventional divisions between humans and non-human animals.

2014-2015 Dissertation Fellowship

2014-2015 Dissertation Fellowship

ELIGIBILITY AND REQUIREMENTS

Applications are invited from doctoral candidates in the humanities and humanistic social sciences such as anthropology, religion, sociology, philosophy, political science, history, English, art history, and comparative literature who engage and transect our seminar topic. This fellowship is only open to Graduate Center doctoral candidates (i.e. you must be Level III. There are no exceptions).

Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar as well as ongoing lectures and symposia. Committee seminars meet on Tuesday mornings and it is a condition of the fellowship that fellows leave this time free in their schedules.

With generous support from the Mellon Foundation and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor, successful candidates will be granted $10,000 total for Fall 2014–Spring 2015 in return for a commitment to fully participate in the work of the Committee and in the weekly seminar. The basis for selection of participants will rest primarily on the relevance to the overall project of the work proposal submitted by applicants. In accord with the interdisciplinary aim of the program, selections will also be made with an eye to maintaining disciplinary diversity.

Doctoral students must apply using the following: Dissertation Fellowship Application 2014–15.

The application materials should be assembled as a single PDF document including the following:

1. Application cover sheet
2. Statement of applicability
3. 9-page proposal and 1-page bibliography
4. 2-page CV
5. Current transcript

Complete application should be sent to the Committee email address. Inquiries can be directed to the same. See application for contact and additional information.

The deadline for applications is Friday, February 14 2014 at noon.

2014-2015 Mid-Career Faculty Fellowships

2014-2015 Mid-Career Faculty Fellowships

Applications are invited from scholars of the humanities and humanistic social sciences such as anthropology, religion, sociology, philosophy, political science, history, English, art history, and comparative literature who engage and transect our seminar topic. With generous support from the Mellon Foundation and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor, successful candidates will be granted two course releases from college teaching requirements, to be distributed across the Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 semesters at their department’s discretion, in return for a commitment to fully participate in the work of the Committee and in the weekly seminar.

The basis for selection of participants will rest primarily on the relevance to the overall project of the work proposal submitted by applicants. In accord with the interdisciplinary aim of the program, selections will also be made with an eye to maintaining disciplinary diversity. Applicants must be tenured, and preference will be given to faculty in the early stages of career development (i.e. within ten years of receiving tenure).

Fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly Committee seminar as well as ongoing lectures and symposia. Committee seminars meet on Tuesday mornings and it is a condition of the fellowship that fellows leave this time free in their teaching schedules.

A completed Faculty Fellow Application is comprised of four parts:

    • A complete Faculty Fellowship Application Form. This should include the signature of the program Executive Officer for faculty with GSUC appointments, or of Department Chairs for non-GSUC appointments
    • 150 word abstract
    • Project description (maximum 1500 words)
    • A current short CV (maximum five pages)

The applications are to be submitted as per the application instructions. The materials, including the signed application form, should be assembled as a single document in PDF and the complete application should be sent to the Committee email address. Inquiries can be directed to the same. See application for contact and additional information.

The deadline for applications is Friday, February 14 2014 at noon.